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Lodge History

The Lodge was built in the 1830s as a sportsman’s hideaway

The Marquis of Sligo is reputed to have named it ‘Delphi’ based on the valley’s. The Marquis of Sligo named it Delphi because of the valley’s alleged similarity to the home of the oracle in Greece – Lord Sligo had toured Greece with Lord Byron and must have been drunk.

Used throughout the next 120 years by the family or leased out to a tenant for the fishing season – mostly British army officers or members of the protestant clergy.

1903 Delphi Lodge was visited by King Edward VII.

Delphi was also mentioned very favourably in several fishing travelogues of the 19th century. Particularly noted for its sea trout, not salmon. “An Elysium Piscatorum” (Walter Peard, A Year of Liberty). Delphi Lodge became came famous from 1958 to 1971 when run by Alec Wallace, a brilliant Trinity College mathematician. He ran the lodge as though it were an informal fishing house-party, attracting many famous guests, including Nobel Prize winners, poets etc came to stay. “A Man May Fish” by Judge T C Kingsmill Moore, reputed to be Ireland’s best ever fishing book, devotes a whole chapter to Alec & Delphi.

Fishery

Fishery

Experiences

Experiences

Activities

Activities